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Welcome to Battlefield Anomalies!

As you see the site has had a major face lift. Old soldiers may die, but technology marches ever on and, sadly the old design was no longer maintainable. One big advantage is that the articles read well on tablet and other small devices, so no excuses for not visiting us more often.

Battlefields are disappearing at an alarming rate; even those which are/were in reasonably good condition with regard to preservation are still threatened by the onward march of progress. This site is aimed, above all else, to gathering and recording as much information as possible on battlefield sites the world over. If you are interested in preserving a record of any site in your country or area please send any details to me so that I can attempt to bring them together in order to compile a battlefield database. We may not be able to save everything, but what can be saved, I am sure, will be of the utmost value to potential battlefield ramblers and military history students of future generations.

Graham J.Morris.
May 2015

The content of this site including many pictures and photographs is available as a 500 page hardback book. Support independent publishing: Buy this e-book on Lulu.

The table below lists the main sections, most recent published first. If you would like a printable copy, please contact the author.

Königgrätz Revisited

May 2015: The largest and most one–sided battle of the nineteenth century?  Well, the first part of the statement is correct. There were more troops on the field of Königgrätz than any other battle, prior to it or after it until the battle of Mukden (20th February–10th March 1905). Even the greatest battle of the century thus far, Leipzig in 1813, also known as the Battle of Nations, in which, on the final day of the battle the troops on both sides numbered, after losses sustained during the previous days fighting, some 420,000 men engaged, still fell short of the 430,000 plus who stood on the field of Königgrätz. This monograph is also available as a fully illustrated book.
Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.

Craonne

June 2013: Napoleon’s campaign of France in 1814 ranks among his finest. His resources were almost near breaking point but somehow the young French recruits managed to pull their emperors chestnuts out of the fire time and again. Their sacrifice for a lost cause should not detract us from remembering their bravery, courage and endurance.

Kulm

June 2012: Like the “curates egg” my description of the Battle of Kulm may be seen by many as being “good in parts.” This notwithstanding, I hope that even if much of what I consider to be a better account of the battle than any other thus far published in English proves to be inaccurate, at least it may be said that it did stir up enough interest in the battle for further research – in itself not a bad thing.

Bohemia

March 2012: After many requests, I have produced a copy of Lieutenant – Colonel Neill Malcolm’s work was “BOHEMIA 1866”. This is available through Lulu for £6-50 and has been fully retyped and includes copies of all the original maps. The book gives much valuable information regarding the campaign and battles of the Austro-Prussian War of 1866.

Sharpsburg

December 2010: Some observations concerning photographs and drawings used in depicting battle scenes.

Swiss Tatics

June 2010: The fighting qualities that made the Swiss one of the most feared and respected military powers in Europe had been nurtured over many centuries.

Outdoor War Games

October 2009: Just for you good folk who have contacted me concerning military history and war gaming – I have indeed played many war games, but not necessarily ones along conventional lines.

More About Eylau

June 2009: Further information about The Battle of Eylau.

Waterloo

March 2009: The full text or ‘Waterloo’ by The Late Captain J.W.E. Donaldson R.A.F., P.S.C. and Captain A.F. Becke, Late R.A.F. Reprints available from Graham.

Caesar

Jan 2009: Updated with a brief review of ‘The Fall of the Roman Empire’ by Arthur Ferrill.

Oudenarde

Jan 2009: The third of Marlborough’s victories, which highlighted the French disunity within their command structure.

Solferino

October 2007: After a long preview, the battle of Solferino, where Napoleon III attempted to follow in the footsteps of his uncle is now ‘official’ (and with three panoramas!).

Neerwinden

May 2006: Graymo and DrBob visited the site of the Battle Of Neerwinden near Brussels. Together they have recreated a virtual tour of the battle site, including interactive panoramas and aerial imagery courtesy of Google Maps.

Chattanooga

May 2006: Grant, Sherman, Thomas and Sheridan: A brief review of their contribution and talents during the Battle of Chattanooga, 23rd-25th November 1863.

Poltava

March 2006: The Battle of Poltava, 28th June 1709

Discussion forum

Jan 2006: Guestbook working again. This time using PhpBB – enjoy the new year! Please take time to register. Your email address is not shown on the web site but other registered users can send you email and you will be notified of any changes to the site.

Caradoc

September 2005: Updated section containing details about a new exploration at Caerwsws.

Spicheren

August 2005: An example of how the French high command managed to turn a potential victory into a defeat.

Moltke

April 2005: Helmuth von Moltke, one of the great commanders of History.

Port Arthur

February 2005: The 100th anniversary of the Russo/Japanese war in 1904/1905.

Lauffeldt

October 2004: The Duke of Cumberland’s failure as military commander.

US Cavalry

July 2004: The Lessons of the American Civil War and European Cavalry Tactics

Ligny

May 2004: The Battle of Ligny, 1815.

Caesar

April 2004: Julius Caesar, a brief outline of his military capabilities.

2 BoerWar

March 2004: The unprepared condition of the British Army for a modern war at the end of the nineteenth century.

1812

Jan 2004: Napoleon’s overblown campaign in Russia, or the little man not being able to reach the top self.

Gettysburg

Nov 2003: The last Confederate invasion of the North – 1863.

Koniggratz

Jan 2003: The Seven Week War between Prussia and Austria – 1866.

Malplaquet

July 2002: Marlborough’s last and bloodiest victory – 1709.

Heilsberg

Sept 2003: Napoleon’s Campaign in Poland – 1807.

Caradoc

Dec 2000: My own views of where Caradoc fought his last battle against the Romans.

Eylau

Jan 2002: The French cavalry charge from a different perspective – 1807.

Fontenoy

Feb 2001: Marshal de Saxe’s victory – 1745.

If you have enjoyed this site, you may also enjoy Museum of Military History in Vienna and John’s Military History Pages.

I would like to thank the many enthusiasts who have helped with this site including:

  •  Albion Swords Ltd. for their permission to use the helmet in the Caradoc article;
  • Jon Townsend for the photograph of the tricorn hats Fontenoy article;
  • The folks at Garden Gnome Software who produce great software for creating virtual tours.

 

Graham J. Morris

25 Mar 2015

2 thoughts on “Home”

  1. Dear Graham,

    with huge interest I have read your articles.
    In the Moltke-article I have found a quotation of “Geschäftsordnung für den Grossen Generalstab”.
    Can you tell me, where you get this book from?

    Best regards,
    Lukas

    1. Dear Lukas,
      Thank you for visiting Battlefield Anomalies and your kind comments regarding the site.

      The German book you mention was not in the public domain at the time of my writing the article on Moltke. I have since been informed that it is now obtainable but only in German from select bookshops. I would search Google for the main outlets in Berlin, plus the Berlin archive service at the military museum in Potsdam.

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